Holy Child Community School

Well Being in Holy Child Sallynoggin

What is Wellbeing?

Student wellbeing is present when students realise their abilities, take care of their physical wellbeing, can cope with the normal stresses of life, and have a sense of purpose and belonging to a wider community. (NCCA Wellbeing Guidelines 2017, pg 17).

The goal of Wellbeing in education is human flourishing for all.

When children and young people are ‘flourishing’ they are not only curious and eager to learn, they are: creative and imaginative, connected and empathetic, good team players, confident about who they are, resilient and persistent, positive about themselves and see themselves growing into better people.

(NCCA Wellbeing Guidelines 2017, Growing Great Kids pg 11)

The Junior Cycle Wellbeing Programme will begin with 300 hours of timetabled engagement in 2017 and build up to 400 hours by 2020 as the new junior cycle is implemented fully in schools. The framework for Junior Cycle (2015) provides for a new area of learning at junior cycle called Wellbeing which will cross the three years of junior cycle and provide opportunities to enhance the physical, mental, emotional and social wellbeing of students.

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HCCS Wellbeing Policy

Mission Statement

Holy Child Community School welcomes students with diverse abilities and talents. In keeping with our Christian ethos, we seek to recognise and develop these varied gifts and to promote in our students a sense of self-confidence, tolerance and respect for others. We foster learning within a secure and happy environment, so that our students may mature to their fullest potential in personal, social, physical, aesthetic, spiritual and academic skills. We see parents as being essential partners in this process and look to them for support and reinforcement. Our school structures, curriculum and special events are all designed to reinforce these values and this vision.

As such H.C.C.S. has a duty to provide the best quality and the most appropriate education and infrastructure in order to promote the wellbeing of our students

Definition of Wellbeing

Wellbeing is defined as “The state of being comfortable, healthy, or happy.” Student wellbeing is present when students realise their abilities, take care of their physical wellbeing, can cope with the normal stresses of life, and have a sense of purpose and belonging to a wider community. (NCCA Wellbeing Guidelines 2017)

Schools have a central role to play in supporting and promoting students’ learning about wellbeing and for wellbeing. They learn about wellbeing through specific areas of the curriculum and various wellbeing events and initiatives that are organised to develop awareness, knowledge and skills about wellbeing. Through the Wellbeing programme students will be learning the knowledge, attitudes and skills to enable them to protect and promote their own wellbeing and that of others. Thinking about learning for wellbeing requires that we consider not only what students learn but also how they learn it. Learning for wellbeing can be nurtured in all subjects and by all teachers.

Whole School Approach to Well-being

A multi-component, preventative, whole school approach to the promotion of well-being, with interventions at both universal and targeted levels, is the priority for H.C.C.S.

This whole school approach involves all members of the school community engaging in a collaborative process of change to improve specific areas of school life that impact on well-being. By adopting a whole school approach H.C.C.S. aims to produce a wide range of educational and social benefits for our pupils, including improved behaviour, increased inclusion, improved learning, greater social cohesion, increased social capital and improvements to mental health.

This whole school approach supports the integration of systems within the school community. This creates the capacity to be reflective and responsive to the needs of our school and the individuals who are part of the school community. Central to this is the role of H.C.C.S. staff and the importance of building professional capacity to engage in a reflective process to implement and sustain well-being policy and strategies from within.

H.C.C.S. is in a unique position to promote well-being, and social and emotional learning, and ensures a whole school approach to well-being promotion and early intervention, especially when considering appropriate use of external supports and services.

Students flourish where there is a whole school approach to supporting their growth and where there is a shared belief in their potential for development, learning and well-being. H.C.C.S. is responsible for providing an environment that nurtures and supports students.

Benefits of promoting pupil well-being in H.C.C.S

By implementing a whole school approach to well-being the benefits include;

  • Better learning results for pupils
  • More done to promote staff health
  • A coordinated approach to social, physical and environmental needs
  • Increased pupil self-esteem
  • Lowered incidence of bullying
  • School environment is safer and more secure
  • Better understanding of schools’ health aims
  • Improved relationships within the school
  • More involvement of parents/guardians
  • Better use of outside agencies
  • Pupils receive better quality education

The Department’s Wellbeing Policy Statement and Framework

The Department’s Wellbeing Policy Statement and Framework for Practice assists schools in ensuring that well-being promotion is embedded within the school’s existing practice. The school’s review and development process using the Wellbeing Policy Statement and Framework for Practice provides guidance and practical resources to assist in the further enhancement of whole school approaches to well-being promotion in the areas of:

culture and environment

curriculum (teaching and learning)

policy and planning

relationships and partnerships

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Environment

H.C.C.S. aims to foster an environment that enhances competence and well-being; one that consciously fosters warm relationships, encourages participation, develops pupil and teacher autonomy and cultivates clarity about boundaries, rules and positive expectations.

Holy Child provides a safe, secure and stimulating environment that encourages and supports pupils, staff and members of the whole school community, both in and out of school. We encourage and promote self-esteem and self-confidence by providing opportunities for all members of the school community to contribute to school life. The school community is encouraged to make healthy choices and to take responsibility for their own health.

H.C.C.S. continues to provide a climate in which good relationships, respect and consideration for others prosper, and where individuals are encouraged to make a vital contribution through their personal skills and qualities.



Curriculum and Learning

The teaching and learning in H.C.C.S. aims to be democratic, inclusive, engaging, differentiated, fostering expectations of high achievement and providing opportunity for success. We place a deliberate focus on the development of emotional and social competencies, through many strategies and interventions , examples of which include; Why Try, Friends for Life, Digital Media Literacy, and others.

The SPHE curriculum in H.C.C.s. strongly supports the social and emotional well-being of our pupils, by placing an emphasis on children’s social and emotional skills, attitudes, behaviour and therefore learning performance. In line with best practice, the Continuum of Support model delivered within our school offers a flexible framework within which we can address all educational needs, including well-being needs of our pupils.

Policy and Planning.

Policies are written documents which support the everyday running of the school through active implementation on a day-to-day basis. They form the background script by which the school navigates its way. They are developed and implemented by the whole school community, not just by one or two people. Parents/guardians and community members are encouraged to participate in policy development through the meeting of our policy development group, which is publicised amongst the entire school community. H.C.C.S. regularly reviews our school policies for staff and pupils that are in accordance with the school aims, philosophy, vision and ethos.

The whole school community of Holy Child will contribute to the wellbeing of our students and support their wellbeing through our culture, our policies, our relationships and in the curriculum. Students, parents and teachers all have a part to play ensuring that student wellbeing is at the heart of our schools vision. Policies and procedures that promote well-being are developed, carried out and reviewed as part of a whole school approach. This process is part of the overall provision for ‘All’.

Policies include:

  • Child Safeguarding Statement
  • Code of Behaviour
  • Anti-Bullying Policy
  • Mobile Phone Policy
  • SEN Policy
  • Child Protection Policy
  • Critical Incident Policy
  • SPHE/RSE policy
  • School Enrolment Policy
  • Attendance Policy
  • Substance Abuse Policy
  • Acceptable Use Policy
  • Homework & Study Policy
  • Healthy Eating Policy



Partnerships

Holy Child continues to develop strong partnerships with parents/guardians through our parent association, home school liaison and wider general communication between partners including our social media presence which includes a school facebook and twitter account and the wider community, which includes a strong tradition of charity work in support of SVP and other organisations and regular workshops and educational experiences involving local and national organisations, which is a central part of the well-being process.

We efficiently engage with appropriate agencies and specialist services to advise, support and contribute to health and well-being, teaching and learning.

Role of Teachers and SNAs

It is essential that all staff continue to develop their competence and confidence in the promotion of wellbeing. The qualified classroom teacher and SNA is the best placed professional to work sensitively and consistently with students and she/he can have a powerful impact on influencing students’ attitudes, values, and behaviour in all aspects of well-being education.

This can be achieved through accessing continuing professional development (CPD) which includes the sharing of expertise and learning, and having opportunities to model and engage in collaborative working.

The curricular elements of well-being promotion will be delivered by staff who are trained for this purpose having completed relevant CPD.

H.C.C.S. well-being protective factors

In H.C.C.S well-being protective factors include:

  • positive relationships with peers and teachers - including positive teacher classroom management strategies and a sharing of positive behaviour management practices with parents
  • a sense of belonging, security and connectedness to school through a positive school climate and participation in school and community activities
  • opportunities for social and emotional learning including the development of attention and planning, self-awareness, self-management, relationship and responsible decision-making skills
  • opportunities for the development of knowledge and skills providing a sense of mastery and self efficacy
  • fostering expectations, recognising contributions, effort and achievement and providing opportunities for success
  • well-being of school personnel
  • protocols and support systems that proactively support children and their families should difficulties arise
  • opportunities to develop the necessary skills to cope with using online technology in a safe and appropriate way
  • opportunities to develop skills to manage stress that may be linked to school work

Programmes and/or External Facilitators

Use of programmes can play a role in supplementing, complementing and supporting a planned comprehensive approach to well-being promotion. Programmes accessed in H.C.C.S.;

  • are part of a whole school approach and address an identified need
  • are delivered to class groups with the involvement of school staff and the appropriate involvement of parents/carers
  • enhance protective factors which predispose students to positive outcomes in the face of adversity such as: facilitating supportive adult-pupil relationships, strengthening life skills, helping students
  • believe in their capacity to overcome hardship and building a sense of mastery over life
  • circumstances
  • adopt a planned implementation process, for example, incorporate needs analysis, use evidence
  • informed programmes and track and evaluate outcomes for students
  • are implemented and used in a school in a sustained way over a number of years in order to bring about lasting effects and benefits

Whole School Supports

  • Tutor/Pastoral time every morning
  • Extra-curricular and co-curricular learning
  • School Initiatives - The school will at all times seek to raise standards of behaviour by adopting a positive approach to school discipline. The work of students and their adherence to the school’s Code of Conduct will be acknowledged, encouraged and rewarded in the following ways:
    • Postcards home
    • Citations at Assembly
    • Attendance awards
    • Involvement in extracurricular outings and tours
    • Academic achievement awards
    • Endeavour awards
    • Merits
    • Newsletter and Year Book mention
    • Social Media mention
    • Work displayed in school

  • One to one meetings with support teachers
  • Wellbeing team, which promotes a culture of wellbeing in the school
  • Care Team - A Care Team meeting is held for each year group every three weeks. In attendance at that meeting are: Year Heads, HSCL Coordinator, Deputy Principal, Chaplain, SCP Representative, Guidance Counsellor. One or more of the Care Team will be asked to intervene in cases of poor attendance.
  • SET
  • Home School Liaison
  • Year Head - The Year Head, supported by a team of tutors, is responsible for monitoring patterns of attendance and punctuality. The Year Head supports the tutors in ensuring that all absences are explained by a note from parents. Where a pupil is identified as having a pattern of poor attendance this is followed up in the first instance by the Year Head by interviewing the student concerned and contacting home. In some instances the Year Head may feel that referral to a member of the Care Team is necessary to improve attendance.
  • Chaplain
  • School Completion Programme
  • Student Council – consists of students from each year group and gives students the opportunity to have their say on school matters and their voices heard.
  • Parents Association

Mission Statement

Holy Child Community School welcomes students with diverse abilities and talents. In keeping with our Christian ethos, we seek to recognise and develop these varied gifts and to promote in our students a sense of self-confidence, tolerance and respect for others. We foster learning within a secure and happy environment, so that our students may mature to their fullest potential in personal, social, physical, aesthetic, spiritual and academic skills. We see parents as being essential partners in this process and look to them for support and reinforcement. Our school structures, curriculum and special events are all designed to reinforce these values and this vision.

As such H.C.C.S. has a duty to provide the best quality and the most appropriate education and infrastructure in order to promote the wellbeing of our students

Definition of Wellbeing

Wellbeing is defined as “The state of being comfortable, healthy, or happy.” Student wellbeing is present when students realise their abilities, take care of their physical wellbeing, can cope with the normal stresses of life, and have a sense of purpose and belonging to a wider community. (NCCA Wellbeing Guidelines 2017)

Schools have a central role to play in supporting and promoting students’ learning about wellbeing and for wellbeing. They learn about wellbeing through specific areas of the curriculum and various wellbeing events and initiatives that are organised to develop awareness, knowledge and skills about wellbeing. Through the Wellbeing programme students will be learning the knowledge, attitudes and skills to enable them to protect and promote their own wellbeing and that of others. Thinking about learning for wellbeing requires that we consider not only what students learn but also how they learn it. Learning for wellbeing can be nurtured in all subjects and by all teachers.

Whole School Approach to Well-being

A multi-component, preventative, whole school approach to the promotion of well-being, with interventions at both universal and targeted levels, is the priority for H.C.C.S.

This whole school approach involves all members of the school community engaging in a collaborative process of change to improve specific areas of school life that impact on well-being. By adopting a whole school approach H.C.C.S. aims to produce a wide range of educational and social benefits for our pupils, including improved behaviour, increased inclusion, improved learning, greater social cohesion, increased social capital and improvements to mental health.

This whole school approach supports the integration of systems within the school community. This creates capacity to be reflective and responsive to the needs of our school and the individuals who are part of the school community. Central to this is the role of H.C.C.S. staff and the importance of building professional capacity to engage in a reflective process to implement and sustain well-being policy and strategies from within.

H.C.C.S. is in a unique position to promote well-being, and social and emotional learning, and ensures a whole school approach to well-being promotion and early intervention, especially when considering appropriate use of external supports and services.

Students flourish where there is a whole school approach to supporting their growth and where there is a shared belief in their potential for development, learning and well-being. H.C.C.S. is responsible for providing an environment that nurtures and supports students.

Benefits of promoting pupil well-being in H.C.C.S

By implementing a whole school approach to well-being the benefits include;

  • Better learning results for pupils
  • More done to promote staff health
  • A coordinated approach to social, physical and environmental needs
  • Increased pupil self-esteem
  • Lowered incidence of bullying
  • School environment is safer and more secure
  • Better understanding of schools’ health aims
  • Improved relationships within the school
  • More involvement of parents/guardians
  • Better use of outside agencies
  • Pupils receive better quality education

The Department’s Wellbeing Policy Statement and Framework

The Department’s Wellbeing Policy Statement and Framework for Practice assists schools in ensuring that well-being promotion is embedded within the school’s existing practice. The school’s review and development process using the Wellbeing Policy Statement and Framework for Practice provides guidance and practical resources to assist in the further enhancement of whole school approaches to well-being promotion in the areas of:

culture and environment

curriculum (teaching and learning)

policy and planning

relationships and partnerships

Holy child.png

Environment

H.C.C.S. aims to foster an environment that enhances competence and well-being; one that consciously fosters warm relationships, encourages participation, develops pupil and teacher autonomy and cultivates clarity about boundaries, rules and positive expectations.

Holy Child provides a safe, secure and stimulating environment that encourages and supports pupils, staff and members of the whole school community, both in and out of school. We encourage and promote self-esteem and self-confidence by providing opportunities for all members of the school community to contribute to school life. The school community is encouraged to make healthy choices and to take responsibility for their own health.

H.C.C.S. continues to provide a climate in which good relationships, respect and consideration for others prosper, and where individuals are encouraged to make a vital contribution through their personal skills and qualities.



Curriculum and Learning

The teaching and learning in H.C.C.S. aims to be democratic, inclusive, engaging, differentiated, fostering expectations of high achievement and providing opportunity for success. We place a deliberate focus on the development of emotional and social competencies, through many strategies and interventions , examples of which include; Why Try, Friends for Life, Digital Media Literacy, and others.

The SPHE curriculum in H.C.C.s. strongly supports the social and emotional well-being of our pupils, by placing an emphasis on children’s social and emotional skills, attitudes, behaviour and therefore learning performance. In line with best practice, the Continuum of Support model delivered within our school offers a flexible framework within which we can address all educational needs, including well-being needs of our pupils.

Policy and Planning.

Policies are written documents which support the everyday running of the school through active implementation on a day-to-day basis. They form the background script by which the school navigates its way. They are developed and implemented by the whole school community, not just by one or two people. Parents/guardians and community members are encouraged to participate in policy development through the meeting of our policy development group, which is publicised amongst the entire school community. H.C.C.S. regularly reviews our school policies for staff and pupils that are in accordance with the school aims, philosophy, vision and ethos.

The whole school community of Holy Child will contribute to the wellbeing of our students and support their wellbeing through our culture, our policies, our relationships and in the curriculum. Students, parents and teachers all have a part to play ensuring that student wellbeing is at the heart of our schools vision. Policies and procedures that promote well-being are developed, carried out and reviewed as part of a whole school approach. This process is part of the overall provision for ‘All’.

Policies include:

  • Child Safeguarding Statement
  • Code of Behaviour
  • Anti-Bullying Policy
  • Mobile Phone Policy
  • SEN Policy
  • Child Protection Policy
  • Critical Incident Policy
  • SPHE/RSE policy
  • School Enrolment Policy
  • Attendance Policy
  • Substance Abuse Policy
  • Acceptable Use Policy
  • Homework & Study Policy
  • Healthy Eating Policy



Partnerships

Holy Child continues to develop strong partnerships with parents/guardians through our parent association, home school liaison and wider general communication between partners including our social media presence which includes a school facebook and twitter account and the wider community, which includes a strong tradition of charity work in support of SVP and other organisations and regular workshops and educational experiences involving local and national organisations, which is a central part of the well-being process.

We efficiently engage with appropriate agencies and specialist services to advise, support and contribute to health and well-being, teaching and learning.

Role of Teachers and SNAs

It is essential that all staff continue to develop their competence and confidence in the promotion of wellbeing. The qualified classroom teacher and SNA is the best placed professional to work sensitively and consistently with students and she/he can have a powerful impact on influencing students’ attitudes, values, and behaviour in all aspects of well-being education.

This can be achieved through accessing continuing professional development (CPD) which includes the sharing of expertise and learning, and having opportunities to model and engage in collaborative working.

The curricular elements of well-being promotion will be delivered by staff who are trained for this purpose having completed relevant CPD.

H.C.C.S. well-being protective factors

In H.C.C.S well-being protective factors include:

  • positive relationships with peers and teachers - including positive teacher classroom management strategies and a sharing of positive behaviour management practices with parents
  • a sense of belonging, security and connectedness to school through a positive school climate and participation in school and community activities
  • opportunities for social and emotional learning including the development of attention and planning, self-awareness, self-management, relationship and responsible decision-making skills
  • opportunities for the development of knowledge and skills providing a sense of mastery and self efficacy
  • fostering expectations, recognising contributions, effort and achievement and providing opportunities for success
  • well-being of school personnel
  • protocols and support systems that proactively support children and their families should difficulties arise
  • opportunities to develop the necessary skills to cope with using online technology in a safe and appropriate way
  • opportunities to develop skills to manage stress that may be linked to school work

Programmes and/or External Facilitators

Use of programmes can play a role in supplementing, complementing and supporting a planned comprehensive approach to well-being promotion. Programmes accessed in H.C.C.S.;

  • are part of a whole school approach and address an identified need
  • are delivered to class groups with the involvement of school staff and the appropriate involvement of parents/carers
  • enhance protective factors which predispose students to positive outcomes in the face of adversity such as: facilitating supportive adult-pupil relationships, strengthening life skills, helping students
  • believe in their capacity to overcome hardship and building a sense of mastery over life
  • circumstances
  • adopt a planned implementation process, for example, incorporate needs analysis, use evidence
  • informed programmes and track and evaluate outcomes for students
  • are implemented and used in a school in a sustained way over a number of years in order to bring about lasting effects and benefits

Whole School Supports

  • Tutor/Pastoral time every morning
  • Extra-curricular and co-curricular learning
  • School Initiatives - The school will at all times seek to raise standards of behaviour by adopting a positive approach to school discipline. The work of students and their adherence to the school’s Code of Conduct will be acknowledged, encouraged and rewarded in the following ways:
    • Postcards home
    • Citations at Assembly
    • Attendance awards
    • Involvement in extra curricular outings and tours
    • Academic achievement awards
    • Endeavour awards
    • Merits
    • Newsletter and Year Book mention
    • Social Media mention
    • Work displayed in school

  • One to one meetings with support teachers
  • Wellbeing team, which promotes a culture of wellbeing in the school
  • Care Team - A Care Team meeting is held for each year group every three weeks. In attendance at that meeting are: Year Heads, HSCL Coordinator, Deputy Principal, Chaplain, SCP Representative, Guidance Counsellor. One or more of the Care Team will be asked to intervene in cases of poor attendance.
  • SET
  • Home School Liaison
  • Year Head - The Year Head, supported by a team of tutors, is responsible for monitoring patterns of attendance and punctuality. The Year Head supports the tutors in ensuring that all absences are explained by a note from parents. Where a pupil is identified as having a pattern of poor attendance this is followed up in the first instance by the Year Head by interviewing the student concerned and contacting home. In some instances the Year Head may feel that referral to a member of the Care Team is necessary to improve attendance.
  • Chaplain
  • School Completion Programme
  • Student Council – consists of students from each year group and gives students the opportunity to have their say on school matters and their voices heard.
  • Parents Association






Wellbeing and Senior Cycle

Themes of wellbeing and the practice of wellbeing skills are incorporated into subject department planning and are part of the learning experience delivered in all senior cycle subjects and programmes.

Guidance education, Physical education (P.E.) and Relationship and Sexuality education are the foundation of wellbeing for senior students .

Students have access to whole school supports





Wellbeing and the Curriculum, Junior Cycle

Wellbeing will cross the three years of junior cycle and build on substantial work already taking place in schools in support of students’ wellbeing. This area of learning will make the school’s culture and ethos and commitment to wellbeing visible to students. It will include learning opportunities to enhance the physical, mental, emotional and social wellbeing of students. It will enable students to build life skills and develop a strong sense of connectedness to their school and to their community.

The goal of Wellbeing in education is human flourishing for all. When children and young people are ‘flourishing’ they are not only curious and eager to learn, they are:

  • Creative and imaginative,
  • Connected and empathetic,
  • Good team players,
  • Confident about who they are,
  • Resilient and persistent,
  • Positive about themselves
  • See themselves growing into better people.

(NCCA Wellbeing Guidelines 2017).

Student wellbeing is at the heart of the vision of the new junior cycle.

The four main pillars of the junior cycle Wellbeing programme are

  • Civic, Social and Political Education (CSPE),
  • Physical Education (PE),
  • Social, Personal and Health Education (SPHE)
  • Guidance education.

Photos

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Websites

jct wellbeing

hse mental health

jigsaw.ie, mental health services and supports for young people

Oct 25
2021
Midterm Break
Nov 10
2021
TY Coco's Law Talk
Nov 11
2021
TY Personal Safety Ire Workshop
Dec 16
2021
Niall de Burca Storyteller
Pearse Street, Sallynoggin, Co. Dublin.
01 285 5334
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